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Egg Yolks: Totally Misconstrued!

 

two-eggs-broken-and-wholeEgg Yolks

What comes to mind?

In reality, when making eggs, many throw away the egg yolk and make egg whites, but truly, if you’re going to throw out anything, it”s actually the white, because the actually nutrition is in the middle.

I am guilty too, don’t worry. For the longest time, I have been minimising my yolk intake drastically to stay away from the demons I believed the Yolks had but boy was I ever wrong. That is not to say I will be abusing egg yolks from hereon, I mean all healthy things in fair consumption make sense.

Eliminating egg yolks from your diet for fear of fat and cholesterol is actually depriving your body of important nutrition, and these will come to light throughout this article.

Here you are, the FACTS:

1. They have so many Vitamins and Minerals!

Reference: An egg yolk a day keeps the doctor away

2. They have phospholipids, which is a type of fat important for building cell membranes, and promoting cardiovascular health, metabolic health, as well as memory and cognitive function.

3. They have Antioxidants

4. Egg yolks have Carotenoids, showing promise for promoting eye health, lowering the risk of  macular degeneration and cataracts and other eye diseases.

Reference: What are the Benefits of Egg Yolks?

Be careful, that is not to say egg whites are not good for you, they are filled with Protein, but that pretty much all they are, compared to their counterpart.

Now for the Top Ten Proven Health Benefits of Eggs according to Authority Nutrition:

  1. Whole eggs are among the most nutritious foods on the planet, containing a little bit of almost every nutrient we need. Omega-3 enriched and/or pastured eggs are even healthier.

  2. Eggs are high in cholesterol, but eating eggs does not have adverse effects on cholesterol in the blood for the majority of people.

  3. Egg consumption consistently leads to elevated levels of HDL (the “good”) cholesterol, which is linked to a reduced risk of many diseases.

  4. Eggs are among the best dietary sources of choline, a nutrient that is incredibly important but most people aren’t getting enough of.

  5. Egg consumption appears to change the pattern of LDL particles from small, dense LDL (bad) to large LDL, which is linked to a reduced heart disease risk.

  6. The antioxidants Lutein and Zeaxanthin are very important for eye health and can help prevent macular degeneration and cataracts. Eggs are high in both of them.

  7. Omega-3 enriched and pastured eggs contain significant amounts of Omega-3 fatty acids. Eating these types of eggs is an effective way to reduce blood triglycerides.

  8. Eggs are fairly high in quality animal protein and contain all the essential amino acids that humans need.

  9. Many studies have looked at egg consumption and the risk of heart disease and found no association. However, some studies have found an increased risk in people with type 2 diabetes.

  10. Eggs are highly fulfilling and tend to make you eat fewer calories, helping you to lose weight

SO, Bottom line…

DO NOT THROW AWAY YOUR EGG YOLK AND SIMPLY EAT THE EGG WHITES, DON’T MISS OUT!

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Frozen Fruits & Vegetables Bad? WRONG!

Many have the impression and belief that frozen fruits and vegetables lose their nutrients once frozen and that having fruits and vegetables *fresh* is MUCH BETTER. I have something for you, that is not true. I have been on your side of the door and I wouldn`t believe how frozen may be more nutritional, however after careful research, it is true! I am not saying frozen is better in all cases, but they can both be as nutritional, if not better.

Frozen may be more healthy than some of the fresh produce sold in supermarkets, although not ­always the case, but check this out:

Fruits and vegetables chosen for freezing are often processed at their peak ripeness, a time when they are most packed with nutrients. Whereas, freshly chosen fruits and vegetables are typically picked before they are ripe, destined to be shipped to supermarkets around the country. This gives them less time to develop all the proper vitamins and minerals. Not to mention, they are left uneaten for the period that they must travel and stay on the shelves for however long until purchased from consumers, then in the consumer`s fridge until actually eaten. In addition, during the travel, fresh fruits and vegetables are exposed to variable temperatures such as heat and light, which degrade some nutrients, especially water-soluble vitamins like B and C.This process almost makes us question how much nutrients are the fresh produces actually offering to our bodies. This is not to say that frozen offers the ultimate nutrient, as the first step to freezing the vegetables and fruits is blanching them in hot water or steaming them. This is done in order to remove all bacteria and to keep away food-degrading enzymes; this then, as well, causes nutrients like vitamin C and Vitamin B to degrade. So as fresh produce, it does lose seldom vitamins, however once frozen, it then locks all nutrients left inside until eaten. However, note that with frozen produce you may still lose more of its nutritive content when reheating, so in order to maintain the most nutrients in frozen produce, reheating in a microwave or steaming is better than boiling, that way you keep the produce as healthful as possible.

So, after this descriptive explanation about FROZEN VS. FRESH, I will leave you to make your own decision. But keep in mind, frozen fruits and vegetables lose nutrients, just as Fresh produce does (through Vitamin B and C), however they still keep more nutrients then Fresh fruits all together, as they are frozen as soon as ready.

Now, when you go to the supermarket to buy *fresh* fruits and vegetables, and as the supermarket tries to convince you that these fruits have *just been picked* with the deceiving mist spray and colouring, you will remember that in reality, these fruits and vegetables have been in storage for a month or more…

So this is all to say that frozen can in fact be nutritionally comparable to ‘fresh’ produce, if not better, contrary to the beliefs out there.

Be sure to eat between five to nine servings of fruit and vegetables per day. Note that a serving is considered to be half cup of sliced fruit or vegetables, and for leafy greens a serving is one full cup.

Enjoy and stay healthy!

Read more:
http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/fresh_vs_frozen_vegetables_are_we_giving_up_nutrition_fo

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2449843/Frozen-food-IS-better-Higher-levels-vitamins-antioxidants.html

http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/healthy-eating/myth-or-fact-fresh-produce-is-more-nutritious-than-frozen-produce.html

Good Carb Bad Carb

Many try dieting by cutting Carbs from their diet. Science shows that carbs are not all bad, some are good, some are bad.

Remember: Carbohydrates=Energy in the body. Without Carbohydrates, you are missing energy!

What are Bad Carbs? Simple carbohydrates which shoot up your blood sugar and cut it down quick, making you crave carbs as you are asking for energy. Examples of bad carbs are muffins, white bread, bagels, cookies, sugar and candy. These carbs are said to be stripped of vitamins, of essential nutrients and of fibers.

What are Good Carbs? Those are brown rice, quinoa, oats, farro, barley, lentils, beans & whole wheat flour. They are called ‘Complex Carbs’ which are carbohydrates that cut the cravings by breaking them down slowly and giving you more energy over a long period of time.

For more details & for A Delicious&Healthy Recipe, view the following video: